Wouldn’t you like to kick off your new year on a positive note, and learn about a concept that creates winners all the way around? January is National Mentoring Month, which means it is the perfect opportunity to learn about how mentoring works and how you can join this significant movement. The 2014 National Mentoring Summit, produced by MENTOR, takes place in Arlington, Virginia on January 30 and 31, 2014.

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Source: YouthBuild NMA via Pinterest

According to David Shapiro, CEO of MENTOR, 1 in 3 young people are reaching the age of 19 without having a mentor. However, those that do have mentors are proven to strive for and reach college, have higher self-esteem and make more positive decisions. This is exactly why MENTOR was started 20 years ago and has gone from 300,000 young people in mentoring programs to 4.5 million!

Whether or not you’re able to attend the Summit, you can take advantage of National Mentoring Month to educate yourself about mentoring and how it works in different environments. Music is fertile ground for mentoring, as we at Over My Shoulder Foundation believe. One of the core aspects of the field of music is collaboration. How often do you hear a musician cite his or her fellow musician influences? Recognizing that fact, it follows that mentoring and musicians fit together like fingers and piano keys.

David believes that mentoring is a very powerful tool and one that every young person should benefit from. We welcome you to learn more about becoming a mentor or mentee! Try to attend the 2014 National Mentoring Summit. Please contact me, Dawn Carroll, at the Over My Shoulder Foundation to learn how you can get involved in Designing the Next Generation, and for what you’ll gain when you embark on this rewarding path.

 

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Source: nokhoog_buchachon via Freedigitalphotos.net

Under the leadership of John F. Fish, Suffolk Construction Company Inc. has achieved many positive distinctions. It is the largest builder in New England, earns two billion dollars per year in revenue, and is one of the country’s most successful building contracting companies. At the same time he has grown the company, Mr. Fish has, through his own example, instilled the values of mentorship and engagement in his company.

Someone who guides a company so successfully certainly learns much along the way, and Mr. Fish has chosen to pass on his experience and wisdom in the form of mentoring. Suffolk’s own Red & Blue Foundation supports groups that seek to better individuals and society, through support of mentoring programs for youth, education, the arts and healthcare.

Mr. Fish and Suffolk Construction recently reached out to young people in a pragmatic and motivational way, through the Youth Mentoring Partnership program. The company partnered with Madison Park Technical Vocational High School and YouthBuild Boston to give technical-vocational students the opportunity to be mentored on-site with Suffolk, and with other leaders in the subcontracting field. This unique symbiosis gave students a head start in the job market, while allowing company representatives to spot talented individuals early on. Truly a win-win situation!

We congratulate and thank Suffolk Construction for supporting Over My Shoulder Foundation’s first annual Designing the Next Generation Extravaganza, which took place on June 18, 2012. This inspiring event brought together speakers from many backgrounds, who shared personal stories of their own mentoring experiences.

John F. Fish’s commitment to mentoring programs for youth has had a positive effect on the lives of many mentees, and he has been a shining example within his own company. You, too, can make a difference in a young person’s life! To learn how, please visit our website for the Over My Shoulder Foundation.

 

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Source: DIE TRIBUTE VON PANEM via Pinterest

Whether we realize it or not, we are constantly surrounded by mentoring relationships. For example, the company you work for may have its own employee mentoring program. If you happen to watch reality competition series on TV such as The Voice, you will see that the participants are receiving valuable mentoring advice from singers with lengthy and successful careers in the industry and that the celebrity mentors are moved by the experience as well.

Think about some of your favorite movies and the relationships that played out in those films. In the cult classic The Karate Kid, the focus of the story is an adult mentoring a troubled youth.

To elaborate on the topic of movie mentors, everyone is talking about The Hunger Games and the most recent release of Catching Fire. In the fantasy world that takes place in this series of stories, teens are made to face off in a truly life-changing competition. Each participant, otherwise known as a “tribute” from his or her district, is paired with a mentor that is often older and experienced with the Hunger Games competition, and this mentoring relationship proves to be instrumental in how the competition turns out.

Our goal at the Over My Shoulder Foundation is to raise the awareness of Mentorology and the positive impact that it can make in the lives of others, whether cross-generationally or cross-culturally. Considering the size of the audience that has seen the films mentioned above, you can see that movie mentors can play a powerful role in reinforcing the benefits and impacts of strong mentoring relationships.

For more about the concept of Mentorology, please contact us at the Over My Shoulder Foundation. If you want to help this cause, become a mentor or donate to our organization!

 

As Thanksgiving is quickly approaching, our team at the Over My Shoulder Foundation wanted to share how thankful we are for all of the mentors that have impacted the lives of our youth and made a difference in Designing the Next Generation.

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Margaret Russell
Source: Kerry via Pinterest

We often use our blog as an opportunity to highlight individuals that have been recognized for their contributions as mentors, and we recently talked about the positive impact that Bina Kalola, head of strategic investments and global equities at Bank of America Merrill Lynch had on women that want to move up the corporate ladder of male-dominated financial institutions. For the music industry, Amy Kurland, founder of the famous Bluebird Cafe, was recently honored with the Frances William Preston Award at the 43rd Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame for helping to launch the careers of so many up-and-coming artists.

We are pleased to announce that President Obama recently appointed Kim Taylor as a member of the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities and Margaret Russell as General Trustee of the Board of Trustees of The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. For the past 30 years, Kim Taylor has been a part of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and has served in a variety of capacities, most recently a Trustee of the BSO. Because of her contributions, the BSO has become a valuable learning tool for our youth. Margaret Russell is currently the Editor and Chief of Architectural Digest, but has mentored many in the design industry through her participation in shows like Top Design.

Both women have made a valuable contribution towards Designing the Next Generation, which has helped to nurture the talent of our youth to help them succeed.

Please remember that January is National Mentoring Month, so let’s help the youth around us!

 

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Source: Craig Janson via Pinterest

If you aspire to have a successful career in the design industry, one of the first steps that you should take is to find a mentor. For some, the thought of finding a mentor can be overwhelming, which is why Designing the Next Generation is our mission at the Over My Shoulder Foundation. Founded on the belief that we can make our rising generation better prepared and passionate about pursuing careers in creative fields through mentoring, we make it our goal to raise the awareness of positive mentoring relationships and the significant impact that they can make.

One mentoring success story that we wanted to share is between David Laufer, visual designer and author, and George Nelson, architect and industrial designer.

When Laufer was young in his career, he knew that he wanted to find a mentor and attempted to set up phone interviews with several of his design idols in hope of developing mentoring relationships. One of his those idols was George Nelson, and Laufer’s manager made him aware of an evening class that he was teaching at the Pratt Institute. After pulling some strings, Laufer was able to sit in on Nelson’s lectures and have an opportunity to build a relationship with him.

Some of the most valuable advice that Laufer learned from Nelson related to public speaking. In one of Laufer’s first one-on-one encounters with Nelson, he was told that anyone can speak eloquently in a public setting with plenty of practice. To this day, per Nelson’s advice, Laufer is constantly putting himself in situations where he is required to speak publicly. The two stayed in touch throughout the years, and Laufer credits Nelson as being one of his greatest and most influential mentors.

For more success stories about mentoring relationships, please contact me, Dawn Carroll.

 

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Source: ExtraTV via Pinterest

We often share mentoring success stories from the mentee’s viewpoint; however, the concept of reverse mentorology can make the experience just as rewarding for the mentor. Well-known singer and actress Cher can attest to this when she was recently asked to be a mentor to participants on the hit reality series The Voice.

Admittedly, her role as a mentor to these up-and-coming singers required much more responsibility than she initially thought, and she was surprised at how emotionally involved she got with her mentees. Ultimately, while her mentees benefited from invaluable advice that Cher was able to offer regarding her lengthy career in the industry, Cher herself learned some important lessons from her mentees that will forever impact her own life.

It was popular country singer Blake Shelton that decided to snag Cher to mentor his team on The Voice, which was an unlikely choice considering that the two specialize in different genres of music and come from different generations. For Blake, Cher has always had a special place in his heart due to his late father’s love of Cher.

At the Over My Shoulder Foundation, we are passionate about raising the awareness of mentorology. We believe that everyone can benefit from positive mentoring relationships, especially when they are derived across generations and cross-culturally. In Cher’s case with the young singers on The Voice, her legendary career and the experience that she gained along the way has allowed her to make a strong impact in Designing the Next Generation. She, too, benefited from this arrangement, making this an excellent example of reverse mentorology.

To learn more about the concept of mentorology, we invite you to contact us at the Over My Shoulder Foundation. We also love to hear your personal mentoring success stories, so please share them with us!

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“I think of it often and imagine the scene clearly. Even if they come to kill me, I will tell them what they are trying to do is wrong, that education is our basic right.” —Malala Yousafzai

Malala Yousafzai showed the world that there is no stopping a hungry mind. At 15 years old she proved that she was willing to risk her life in the pursuit of an education. On October 9th, 2012, while riding home from school, Taliban agents stopped her car and shot Malala in the head. She survived the attack, and bravely refused to surrender her dream. Because of her courage and her dedication to the cause of education for all, Malala became the youngest Nobel Peace Prize nominee ever. She has inspired girls around the world to pursue their goals fearlessly and NOT to let anyone get in the way of their education, or their dreams. It shows how one person can inspire change in the world.

I immediately thought of Malala when I heard the story below, written by our dynamic team member Marissa Ranahan. After you read about this uplifting example of mentorship, share the story on social media, encourage your friends and community to support the Malala Fund, and take a few moments to think about how you could make positive change in the world by becoming a mentor.

Dawn Carroll, Over My Shoulder Foundation Co-Founder and Executive Director

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“Mentoring someone doesn’t need to be a lifetime job. Sometimes, it can simply be a lesson that can be carried through a lifetime. This story proves that anyone, at any time, can be a mentor in their own way. It’s the little things that have the greatest impact.” —Marissa Ranahan

Copyright shadowgirl08

Those were her exact words, and I smiled as soon as she mentioned the word mentor. Since joining the team at Over My Shoulder, it seemed to me that every person I encountered had someone in their life as a mentor.I asked her quickly if she enjoyed reading, and her face lit up. She was twenty-three years old. She had a soft smile, with a brightly colored hijab wrapped tightly around her head. We started to talk about books and different genres of literature. She nodded her head in agreement and smiled as I spoke. “Can I tell you something?” she asked. “I have a mentor who taught me how to read, because I am not allowed to.”

This young woman came to America from the Middle East, where she was never taught how to read. Although she always longed to learn, she was not allowed. When a neighbor in the U.S. found out she wasn’t able to read, the woman offered to give private reading lessons, without the knowledge of her disapproving family. They met every Wednesday night in secret until the young woman’s family came home from work. When everyone was asleep, she would take out her books and practice the sentence structure her neighbor had taught her. After six months of study, she was already reading chapter books.

“To me” she said, “Reading is like a different language. After listening to it, I hungered for more, but I was restricted from reading. I consider my neighbor my mentor, my reading mentor, and a woman who had opened up new doors to my knowledge. To me, this is the best guidance I have ever received.”

The admiration she had for this woman was obvious, even in our brief encounter. I asked her what a “mentor” was in her own words—she responded, “A mentor is someone who comes into your life like a guardian angel, and helps you fulfill a passion that was missing before. It might not be for a lifetime, but as soon as you feel like someone believes in you, that feeling will carry through your lifetime.”

I haven’t seen this young lady again. But the message of her story is universal, and deserves to be heard. Anyone can be a mentor. Small acts of mentorship, like teaching one person to read, reverberate for a lifetime. The reward of helping another person is priceless.

Marissa Ranahan, Over My Shoulder team member

 

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This program treats membership like a true partnership. Source: stockimages via Freedigitalphotos.net

If you are looking to become more involved in your community, one of the best ways to do so is to sign up to be a mentor. This is especially true for those involved in the creative design field. Young people interested in pursuing a career in this area often receive limited direction from teachers and guidance counselors as they are often not as familiar with opportunities in this industry and/or art and design mentoring programs available.

For those living in the New York area, the AIGA/NY Mentoring Program helps to pair passionate high school students attending the New York City High School of Art and Design with mentors that are already creative professionals with blossoming careers.

What makes this program unique from other art and design mentoring programs is that mentors are required to make a 3 year commitment to the program as the relationship begins during the student’s sophomore year and runs through graduation. Each pair will spend a minimum of four hours together each month. Because of the accountability that the mentor and mentee have to each other with this program, many of the students go on to graduate high school and receive a higher degree in a creative design field.

If this article has inspired to you learn more about our Designing the Next Generation mission at the Over My Shoulder Foundation, I invite you to contact me, Dawn Carroll, for more information. Also, please be sure to check out our blog for more inspirational mentoring stories and feel free to share your own with us!

 

We’ve used our Over My Shoulder Foundation blog to make you aware of several music mentoring programs, and most of these programs are focused on adults mentoring youth. Peer-to-peer counseling can prove to be just as valuable, which is why we wanted to mention the Music Buddies Mentoring Program through the American Youth Philharmonic Orchestra (AYPO).

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Source: Vichaya Kiatying-Angsulee via SXC.hu

One goal of the Music Buddies Mentoring Program is to provide private music instruction to students that may not have the financial means to receive such training otherwise. All of the mentors in this program are currently youth musicians (8th grade and older) from the American Youth Concert Orchestra (AYCO), American Youth Symphonic Orchestra (AYSO), or the American Youth Philharmonic Orchestra (AYPO).

When pairing program participants with mentors, the Music Buddies Mentoring Program takes into account both the age of the participant and the instrument that the participant plays to make the best match. Students will meet with their mentors on a weekly basis at T.C. Williams High School for basic instruction, exercises, and practice of school orchestra/band music. The youth mentors then meet with program director Laura Cahn after practice to discuss important learning skills to help enhance their roles as music mentors and teachers.

A second goal of this unique music mentoring program is to not only increase the interest of music in our youths’ lives, but to help keep them active and engaged in their schools’ music programs. All of the youth participants in the Music Buddies Mentoring Program, whether mentors or mentees, are sure to learn valuable lessons and skills from each other.

To learn more about music mentoring programs in your area or how you can become a mentor through music, please contact me, Dawn Carroll, at the Over My Shoulder Foundation.

 

Youth that are involved in an extracurricular activity such as sports, art or music are more likely to stay in school and develop a positive self-image. The Charity Music Mentoring Program was founded with the understanding that all youth have the potential to succeed in life if they have access to a solid role model that offers support and encouragement along the way. This program is aimed at serving disadvantaged youth in Michigan that are currently enrolled in the Macomb Intermediate School District and have an interest in music.

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Source: worradmu via Freedigitalphotos.net

This unique youth mentoring program utilizes music to inspire their students to explore their creative sides, often helping youth to uncover hidden musical talents. In addition to providing free music education to program participants, the students also have the ability to borrow a variety of instruments to determine which one best suits them.

If you have ever expressed an interest in becoming a music mentor, the Charity Music Mentoring Program is currently searching for mentors to serve as music instructors with expertise in the flute, clarinet, drums, voice, and other instruments. To learn more about how you can make a difference with this wonderful program, please contact Music Mentors of Michigan at 586-808-7445.

We, too, are passionate about Designing the Next Generation at the Over My Shoulder Foundation. We recently shared the inspirational story about how Amy Kurland, founder of the Bluebird Cafe, served as one of the greatest music mentors as her Nashville cafe launched the careers of several singers and songwriters such as Garth Brooks and Taylor Swift.

I, Dawn Carroll, have personally benefited from a music mentor in my life, which ultimately inspired me to found the Over My Shoulder Foundation along with Grammy winner Patti Austin. To learn more about our organization and becoming a music mentor, please contact us!

 

Music is capable of many things. Singing and songwriting can provide an outlet for some who otherwise would find it hard to communicate. For others, music is a way to break down barriers and achieve things that they could have only dreamed of. That’s why I believe that mentoring those who have this wonderful ability is so important. The Over My Shoulder Foundation, after all, was started because of a song by the same name that I wrote. This song was performed by legendary Grammy Award Winner Patti Austin and her mentee.

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Amy Kurland’s Bluebird Cafe has sparked many creative careers. Source: Cheapflights via Pinterest

Now, if you’ve ever been to Nashville or watched the hit series on ABC, you know that the Bluebird Cafe is one of the city’s most famous landmarks. This intimate 90-seat venue is the setting where many famous country music artists have been discovered including Garth Brooks and Taylor Swift.

In 1982, Amy Kurland opened the Bluebird Cafe, and since then her cafe has helped launched the careers of several aspiring songwriters and singers. By creating an environment where local Nashville artists can test their talent in front of a live audience that is often filled with influential guests in the music community, Kurland has become one of the most regarded mentors in Nashville.

To honor her, Kurland will receive the Frances William Preston Award at the 43rd Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame Dinner on October 13th. One recipient of this award is chosen each year, and the intention is to recognize an individual that has helped pave the way for songwriters. Kurland was a natural choice for this award as she has always felt that people are just as interested in the songwriter as the person singing the song, which in many ways is why the Bluebird Cafe has been so successful over the years.

The music mentoring awards event will also honor the year’s best song, songwriter, and the “Top 10 Songs I Wish I Had Written.” To learn more about the upcoming music mentoring awards and attending this event, please call 615-256-3354.

If you don’t live in the Nashville area and would be interested in attending an upcoming mentoring event near you, please contact me at the Over My Shoulder Foundation. I use the blog as an opportunity to make others aware of ways that they can get mentoring help or become a mentor themselves.

 

There is no question that there is a growing number of high school students that have expressed an interest in a career in the design industry. However, it’s unfortunate that parents, teachers, and even guidance counselors are not well versed on art and design mentoring programs that would offer students additional exposure in this area. Since we’ve made it our mission to share the powerful impact that “Mentorology” can have on Designing the Next Generation, we wanted to make our followers aware of a program called Youth Design.

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The path is easier with a helping hand. Source: Jenny Pollock via Pinterest

Seeing a great need for an art and design mentoring program in the Boston community, the Youth Design mentorship program was established to expose inner-city high school students to what a career would look like in the design industry. Participants not only have the opportunity to work closely with some of the most respected design firms in the city, but also earn an income during the program.

Denise Korn, in conjunction with Boston’s American Institute of Graphic Arts organization and Boston’s Private Industry Council, founded this summer mentorship program to provide guidance to students with a creative spirit that are looking to pursue a career in the design industry.

To date, a total of 59 students have come through the Youth Design program, which has resulted in many of them going on to study for a career in the creative industry in college. To learn more about this wonderful mentoring program and how you can become involved, please contact Youth Design at 857-277-1737.

If you would like to find out about other art and design mentoring programs in your area, please subscribe to the Over My Shoulder Foundation blog and be sure to “like” us on Facebook too!

 

 

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Join the over 400 artists this program has helped already. Source: Shelly Leit via Pinterest

We recently shared a program with you that is dedicated to women in mentoring, and due to this being such an important topic to us, we wanted to share another program with you that is dedicated to the continued professional growth for women artists.

Since 1982, WARM (Women’s Art Resources of Minnesota) has developed a mentoring program to provide the necessary support to women artists as they balance work and family life and deal with other challenges such as the under-representation of women in the industry, diversity, and building a successful career. There are few artists mentoring programs out there, and over the past 30 plus years, this program has served more than 450 artists that have gone on to have fruitful careers.

What differentiates this mentoring program from others is that it lasts for two years, and each participant plays a direct role in selecting her mentor, outlining her goals, and tracking her progress along the way. To go along with our Designing the Next Generation mission, this program has been created to serve a young and budding artist that is just beginning her career.

For those interested in participating in the program as either a protegee or mentor, the next two year cycle begins in January 2015. The program is currently accepting applications for both positions, and you can contact Tina Nemetz or Karen Searle for more information: 612-567-9276.

To learn more about artists mentoring programs, please contact us at Over My Shoulder Foundation. SHARE your mentoring stories with us on our Facebook page, consider donating to our foundation, and don’t forget to follow Over My Shoulder Foundation on Facebook too!

 

I have experienced much success in my career due to the mentors that have impacted my life, which is why I co-founded the Over My Shoulder Foundation with Patti Austin. We often like to use our blog as an opportunity to highlight strong and formidable mentoring programs, and we would be remiss if we did not mention the SUCCESS Mentoring Program at Texas Woman’s University.

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SUCCESS can help you start off on the right foot at Texas Woman’s University. Source: Mentor Works Ltd. via Pinterest

There are few programs out there dedicated to women in mentoring, and the SUCCESS Mentoring Program has been designed to cater to women that are first-generation college attendees in their family. Through this program, mentors will be provided to these young women to provide them with the support that they need to have a successful first year of college and lay the foundation for future years.

Participants in the program will not only have their mentors to help guide them through this process, but an entire support network of peers that are also part of the program. Through activities that encourage social interaction, leadership development, and educational success, these women will be better prepared and are more likely to stay in school through graduation.

The mentors in the program are upperclassmen and can offer valuable experience and expertise for the challenges that incoming freshmen often face in their first year. The program participants will meet with their mentors one-on-one twice each month in addition to attending monthly social activities within the group. This is a great way to foster long-lasting, positive relationships that will continue throughout the participants’ college careers.

To learn more about this program, please contact Michelle Buggs: 940-898-3679.

If you are interested in learning more about Mentorology or Designing the Next Generation, please contact us at the Over My Shoulder Foundation.

 

For those looking for design mentoring programs in Jacksonville, we wanted to take a moment to highlight the Discover Design Mentoring Program, which is targeted to high school students living in the Jacksonville, Florida area. Since 2008, this five month mentoring program has paired high school students with an interest in design with local design professionals in the community.

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One aspect of the program is creating materials that encourage others to get involved in their communities. Source: Nick Sherman

Throughout the duration of the program, the students meet with their professional design mentors on weekends to complete design related projects that will better the community. Examples of previous projects that have been completed include posters to encourage voting, billboards that promote tolerance, and an iPad app that highlighted local cultural “hot spots” around Jacksonville for teens to check out.

The effectiveness of this mentoring program has been incredible, encouraging the quieter students to really come out of their shells and find themselves. Much of this can be attributed to the mentoring relationships that the students have built with their design professionals, which has offered them confidence and trust to see the project through.

This program has helped students to connect some of the basic design principles that they have learned in school to a larger social, economic, and cultural environment and find ways to improve upon it. In addition, the mentors participating in this program are often exposed to new ways of thinking about things, and the students help them to be aware of things that they may not have known about otherwise. We look forward to seeing more local design mentoring programs offer the same benefits to mentors and students in the future.

If you enjoy the content shared by the Over My Shoulder Foundation, contact us! SHARE your mentoring stories, consider donating to our non-profit organization, and don’t forget to follow Over My Shoulder Foundation on Facebook too!

 

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School: By Design gives students a chance to make a difference in their school. Source: nolaclutterbusters

Getting our youth involved in design mentoring programs is one of our goals with our Designing the Next Generation initiative, which is why we often use our blog as an opportunity to share mentoring success stories.

One unique program that we wanted to mention is School: By Design, which pairs under-served high school students up with mentors that are either in college or design professionals. Through this one-of-a-kind program, the students will collaborate with their mentors to redesign their schools, which will in turn expose them to architecture, industrial design, graphic design, environmental graphics, interactive design, illustration, and photography. Ultimately, these disciplines encourage creativity and new ways of thinking about things, which will be useful skills that the students will be able to use throughout their lives.

The overall goal of this six week program is to get the students thinking outside of the box about solutions to problems and challenges that currently exist within their schools and finding ways to address them. Together, the teams will work to develop solutions that not only will improve the quality of learning that students will receive in the classroom, but also in the local community as well.

To conclude the program, students will be able to exhibit their design plans in a public venue to help share their vision with peers, school administrators, and the local community. As mentors, there is so much that we can learn from this experience, and getting our youth involved and excited about the world of design is key to a successful future. To learn more about how you can participate in this program, please complete and submit the registration form to Worldstudio.

To learn more about design mentoring programs, please contact us at the Over My Shoulder Foundation! We also invite you to SHARE your mentoring success stories!

 

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We’re proud to have Shea Rose join our team!

Bridgetown recording artist Shea Rose is the newest member of the Over My Shoulder Foundation Family. Through her music-based outreach programs, she has shown her dedication to fostering relationships with others and serving as a mentor to enact social change.

In the coming weeks, Rose will be headed to Barbados to join the International Artist & Residency Program at Fresh Milk Art Platform, where she will be exploring the themes of musical and cultural identity through performance and presenting workshops to school-aged children in Barbados.

The Fresh Milk Art Platform Inc. is a Caribbean non-profit, artist-led, inter-disciplinary organization that supports creatives and promotes wise social, economic, and environmental stewardship through creative engagement with society and by cultivating excellence in the arts.

Rose has previously worked with local, national and international organizations through her outreach initiative, “My Angel Wears a Fro,” which she uses to promote social change through music. Through these organizations, Rose has volunteered, performed, and presented lectures, workshops and clinics.

While at the Berklee College of Music, Shea Rose received the Walter W. Harp Liberal Arts Music and Society Award for her demonstration of outstanding achievement in research, civic engagement and performance relating to music and society. She was the President of The Movement, an organization which employed music-based service initiatives to serve the Boston community. The Movement paired students, faculty, staff and alumni volunteers with local groups so that they could share their knowledge and set examples as leaders to Boston-area students.

We are thrilled to have Shea Rose join the OMSF team. Her unique perspective is sure to help us grow in our efforts to provide guidance and promote mentorship in our community.

 

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Take a note from Oprah’s success story. Source: Story Accents

We recently talked about famous mentor pairs, including Oprah Winfrey and her fourth grade teacher, Mrs. Duncan. It’s no surprise that some of the most successful and influential people in the world can tie the defining moments in their lives back to a strong mentoring relationship. To expand on our celebrity mentorship stories, let’s further discuss the role that Mrs. Duncan, Oprah’s mentor, played in her life.

When Oprah was in the fourth grade, the biggest impact that Mrs. Duncan made on Oprah’s life was to help her to not be afraid of being smart. Not only did she encourage her to read, but Mrs. Duncan frequently stayed after school with Oprah to work with her on assignments, help her to select new and challenging books, and even let her grade papers.

Mrs. Duncan’s relationship to Oprah as a mentor helped her to see the better part of herself that was hidden from her own view. While at the time Oprah wanted to go on to be the best teacher that anyone had ever seen, she accomplished this goal at a much greater level by serving as a teacher and mentor to millions of women across the globe through her extremely successful career as supervising producer and host of The Oprah Winfrey Show.

According to Oprah, “mentors are important and I don’t think anybody makes it in the world without some form of mentorship.” Our team at the Over My Shoulder Foundation couldn’t agree with you more, Oprah. To learn more about celebrity mentorship stories and the impact that a mentoring relationship can have in your life, please contact us at the Over My Shoulder Foundation.

 

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There’s a lot we can learn from Kenneth Cole’s example.

We recently talked about some of the biggest names in Hollywood and who they credit as their mentors along the way. To add to this list of famous mentors, we wanted to take a moment to share Kenneth Cole’s story.

Successful footwear and accessory designer Kenneth Cole did not always plan to be in the shoe business. In fact, he pursued an undergraduate degree at Emory University in Atlanta with the intent of attending law school; however, upon graduation from college, his father needed his help at his shoe factory after his right hand man left to start a competitive business. Kenneth’s father taught him the value of hard work and began bringing him to the shoe factory when he was just ten years old.

His father has proved to be one of the most influential mentors in his life, teaching him the important lesson that if he wanted to succeed, he would need the support and respect of everyone within the company. Early in his career, Kenneth realized that he may not have the experience to impress his peers with knowledge, but he could make a lasting impression on others with the quality of his work. For example, if he knew the first employee arrived at 6:30 a.m. each day, he would arrive at 6:15.

Because Kenneth’s father was such a great role model early in his career, he had the confidence and support to eventually start his own business. These basic principles learned from his father have stuck with him to this day and have become a vital part of his company’s philosophy.

To learn more about success stories from famous mentors, please be sure to visit the Over My Shoulder Foundation online.

Image Source:  Be the Change, Inc.